St John's College Oxford
Dr Stuart Wigby

Dr Stuart Wigby

Stipendiary Lecturer in Biological Sciences

Biography

I studied Zoology at Sheffield (1997-2000) and, after working as a research assistant and postman, took up a PhD at University College London (2001-2005). After a BBSRC funded post-doc at UCL (2005-2008), I moved to Oxford on a Lloyd’s Tercentenary Fellowship (2008-2010) and subsequently held a Welcome VIP award (2010-2011) and a NERC fellowship (2013-2014). In 2014 I took up a BBSRC David Phillips fellowship.

Teaching

I have taught various subjects including: Animal Behaviour; Animal Biology; Evolution and Systematics; Statistics; Population Biology; Behaviour and Evolution; Advanced Behavioural Ecology; Sex, Genes and Evolution; Biology of Ageing; Genes to Organisms.

Awards and distinctions

2019: Wellcome Trust ISSF (Institutional Strategic Support Fund) award
2014 - 2019: BBSRC David Phillips Fellowship
2013 - 2016: NERC Research Fellowship
2013 - 2015: John Fell Fund Award
2010 - 2011: Wellcome Trust VIP Award
2009 - 2011: Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour (ASAB) Research Grant
2008 - 2010: Lloyd’s Tercentenary Foundation Fellowship
2008: Human Frontier Science Foundation Short-Term Fellowship

Recent publications

  • 2018: Bath, E., Morimoto, J., & Wigby, S.The developmental environment modulates mating-induced aggression and fighting success in adult female Drosophila. Functional Ecology, In Press
  • 2017: Le Page, S., Sepil, I., Flintham, E., Pizzari, T., Carazo, P., Wigby, S. Male relatedness and familiarity are required to modulate male-induced harm to females in Drosophila. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 284: 20170441.
  • 2017: Bath, E., Bowden, S., Peters, C., Reddy, A., Tobias, J. A., Easton-Calabria, E., Seddon, N., Goodwin S. F., & Wigby, S. Sperm and sex peptide stimulate aggression in female Drosophila. Nature Ecology & Evolution, 1, 154 [News & Views in Nature Ecol & Evol 1, 174]
  • 2017: Hopkins, B., Sepil, I., & Wigby, S. Seminal Fluid. Current Biology, 27 (11), R404-R405
  • 2016: Wigby, S., Perry, J.C., Kim, Y.-H. & Sirot, L.K. Developmental environment mediates male seminal protein investment in Drosophila melanogasterFunctional Ecology, 30, 410-419

Research Interests

I am broadly interested in the evolutionary biology of reproduction, and my research covers sexual selection, sexual conflict, speciation, sperm competition, mating and immunity, life history and ageing.

I use the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, as a model organism to investigate these topics. My current main research questions are: 

  1. Why are sex and ageing linked?  
  2. Why do some individuals have more mates than others?